All posts by allinmountainbrook

Mental Health & Youth: Information

Teen Depression

See our Youth Suicide Prevention Resources here.

National Institutes of Mental Health: Teen Depression

More Than Sad: Teen Depression

“How to talk to your teen about depression, suicide.” Washington Post

Bipolar Disorder

National Institutes of Mental Health: Bipolar Disorder in Children and Teens

American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry: Bipolar Disorder in Youth

Anxiety

AACAP: Your Adolescent – Anxiety and Avoidant Disorders

Substance Abuse

Eating Disorders

Parent Toolkit on Eating Disorders

 

New: Youth Suicide Prevention Resources

In partnership with Mountain Brook Schools, All In Mountain Brook offers this resource guide to the prevention of youth suicide. This site is intended as a starting point for those young people struggling with suicidal feelings, their families, and their friends.

Click here for the resource guide.

Youth Suicide Warning Signs and How to Respond
Video: Leap of Faith
Video: More Than Sad
Resources
     Emergencies
     Crisis Center (Birmingham)
     National Suicide Prevention Hotline
     Mental Health Care
     Mountain Brook Schools Counselors and Other Resources

An update on the Alabama Graduated Drivers License law-Revised June 2017

 

Revised June 8, 2017

The Alabama Graduated Drivers License law was passed in its current form in 2010. HB29, a bill to strengthen the law, passed during the 2017 legislative session and was enacted into law by Governor Ivey on May 24, 2017.

So, the law has changed!

Let’s review the law and include the changes.


What?

The Alabama Graduate Drivers License (GDL) law establishes three types of drivers licenses:

  • Stage I: Learner’s Permit (age 15)
  • Stage II: Restricted License (all age 16, as long as they are 16, AND 17-year olds licensed less than 6 months.)
  • Stage III: Full License (17-years-old AND Stage II held for at least six months)

Stage II places certain restrictions on young drivers.

Who?

The restrictions apply to all 16-year-old drivers as long as they are 16. Contrary to a common misunderstanding, the restrictions do not expire when a 16-year-old driver has had their license for 6 months. The restrictions expire when the 16-year-old driver has turned 17 AND (not or) has had his or her license for at least 6 months.
Continue reading An update on the Alabama Graduated Drivers License law-Revised June 2017

Blue Whale Challenge: What We Know (Very Little) and Don’t Know (a Lot).

Dr. Dale Wisely on the viral news stories regarding the “Blue Whale Challenge.”

Update: I just searched news sites, looking for evidence of escalation of this phenomenon. I’m not finding much.

There is a story in Russia about a young girl who threw herself into a river after playing the “game”–she was rescued. A man in England whose young son died by suicide told press his son had been playing the game.

A 12-year-old in Mississippi has told her family and authorities that she participated the game.

It’s best to be tentative about this but while there is still reason to be concerned, it does appear that news reports about the game a faster viral phenomenon than the game itself.

Exit Strategies: An online talk by Dr. Dale Wisely

Here is a 30-minute video presentation by Dr. Dale Wisely.

Tragically, the overwhelming majority of deaths of teenagers occur as a result of high-risk behavior. But the consequences of risky behavior can also lead to disability, unnecessary suffering, legal problems, and other serious troubles.

In this presentation, Dr. Wisely presents ways for parents to better understand why teenagers get involved in high-risk behavior. Dr. Wisely then outlines a parenting approach that may better prepare teenagers for avoiding and extricating themselves from dangerous situations.

Dale Wisely, Ph.D. is Director of Student Services at Mountain Brook Schools. He is a founding board member of All In Mountain Brook. Dr. Wisely is a clinical child & adolescent psychologist. 

Yik Yak no longer available on or near MBJH & MBHS campuses

yik-yak-appThe makers of the notorious social media app Yik Yak have made it unavailable on or near the Mountain Brook Junior High and Mountain Brook High School campuses.

Yik Yak made a program available whereby they block, on request, the use of the app on or near middle school and high school campuses. This is called “geofencing.” So, we looked up the GPS coordinates of both campuses and submitted those to Yik Yak. The app appears to be blocked on those campuses. We also submitted the GPS coordinates for the elementary schools, but Yik Yak does not have a program for blocking those.

Yik Yak appears to have made another positive change by requiring that users enter and verify their phone numbers. Previously, Yik Yak did not require user input of any information in order to use the app, allowing a level of anonymity which encouraged the use of the app for making threats and for bullying.

There have been a number of arrests of individuals who have made serious threats on Yik Yak. The company appears to be cooperating with law enforcement in holding its users accountable for serious criminal conduct.

Dale

Dale Wisely, Ph.D.