Monthly Archives: November 2015

Yik Yak no longer available on or near MBJH & MBHS campuses

yik-yak-appThe makers of the notorious social media app Yik Yak have made it unavailable on or near the Mountain Brook Junior High and Mountain Brook High School campuses.

Yik Yak made a program available whereby they block, on request, the use of the app on or near middle school and high school campuses. This is called “geofencing.” So, we looked up the GPS coordinates of both campuses and submitted those to Yik Yak. The app appears to be blocked on those campuses. We also submitted the GPS coordinates for the elementary schools, but Yik Yak does not have a program for blocking those.

Yik Yak appears to have made another positive change by requiring that users enter and verify their phone numbers. Previously, Yik Yak did not require user input of any information in order to use the app, allowing a level of anonymity which encouraged the use of the app for making threats and for bullying.

There have been a number of arrests of individuals who have made serious threats on Yik Yak. The company appears to be cooperating with law enforcement in holding its users accountable for serious criminal conduct.

Dale

Dale Wisely, Ph.D.

 

 

 

Suicidal thinking in very young children.

In the current issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry (November 2015) there is a research report, and accompanying commentary, about suicidality (that word refers to suicidal thoughts, gestures, attempts, and actual deaths) in very young children, age 3-7.

Fortunately, deaths by suicide in young children are very rare, however, this study suggests that suicidal thoughts are common among children with clinical depression and other forms of psychopathology.

When I began my career in the early 80s, psychologists and psychiatrists were just beginning to recognize that children, including young children, can suffer from all kinds of psychiatric disorders one sees in adults, including the whole range of mood disorders such as depression and bipolar illness. Prior to that time, most mental health professionals believed that if a child appeared depressed, it was strictly because there was something wrong with his or her family or social situation, not because of the biochemical/psychosocial reasons that seem to contribute to clinical depression.

We know much more about suicide in adults and in teenagers. We know, for example, that in the last 10 years or so, teen suicide rates are actually stable and are considerably lower than they were 30 years ago, in spite of the widespread myth that there is an epidemic of teen suicide. Similarly, suicide among the elderly is stable. On the other hand, in the last 10 years, suicide among middle-aged people has risen nearly 30%. It has always been true that adults are much more likely to die by suicide than teenagers and children. The short guide to the demographics of suicide deaths is: Older more than younger; whites more than blacks; men more than women.

When an individual has mental illness, particularly, but not exclusively, depression, suicidal thinking, suicide attempts, and deaths by suicide are a risk. Because we know that even young children can suffer from mental illness, including mood disorders, the question of how suicidality affects these children is something we know too little about.
Continue reading Suicidal thinking in very young children.